AASHUDNA

Registered DOGS NSW Breeder of Miniature Smooth Dachshunds

CH. AASHUDNA MAGIC N MAYHAM

CH. AASHUDNA MAGIC N MAYHAM

Jade is like a fine wine, improving each year as she matures. She is a smaller type and has changed dramatically since the age of 18 months, much like her Dam and her Dam’s Sire.

Jade is well-angled, compact yet well-bodied, with an elegant reach of the neck. Since her second heat, her bone structure has gone from fine to moderate, and her front and body have also dropped, making her look less tall. She carries her topline well, has excellent reach, with a balanced rear. I am very pleased with her.

Pedigree

Our breeding program is dedicated to selectively breeding dachshunds with established and verifiable pedigrees. By adhering to this fundamental principle, we maintain the integrity of our breeding process, enhancing the well-being and predictability of our puppies. We firmly believe that upholding this commitment distinguishes us as exceptional breeders within our hobby.

Pedigree
SSS: Aust. CH. Nilite Fraser ORiley
SS: Aust. CH. Solana Le Maire Valjean
SSD: Solana My Miss Aingael
SIRE: Aust. CH. Dawnwood Muscari
SDS: Aust. CH. Sonderbar Its Time
SD: Aust. CH. Dawnwood Sweet Lilli
SDD: Sonderbar Roxanne
DSS: Aust. CH. Zyzemup Fezz
DS: Acovagem Beng N.E.
DSD: Zyzemup Emma Kerri
DAM: Aashudna Maggie May
DDS: Aust. CH. Zyzemup Mr Kool Kat
DD: Zyzemup Disco Daisy
DDD: Aust. CH. Zyzemup Mocha Dlite
5/5

Health Testing

Only PRA Cord 1 is a recommended test by the National Breed Club, all the tests below are done so at the breeder’s own discretion prior to breeding. At Aashudna Dachshunds, we pride ourselves in our pre-breeding health screening.

We strongly advise buyers to only obtain puppies of which the parents were DNA tested for SDMD and PRA cord 1, ensuring two carriers have not been bred together..

High Risk Impact

Sarcoglycan Deficient Muscular Dystrophy (SDMD)

The rarest form of Muscular Dystrophy identified in Miniature Dachshunds from Australia, Sth Africa and the USA.

Affected, otherwise seemingly healthy Dachshunds tend to die without warning from heart failure. Clinical sign first noted is at about 6 months of age and can include exercise intolerance, stiffness, choking, and difficulties in eating and drooling. Due to muscle deterioration, it may involve relatively high treatment/management costs. The life expectancy of an affected dachshund is less than 2 years, though 8 years has been recorded.

This mutation is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. Due to DNA testing, this disease is now under control.

 

Result: Clear by parentage

Low Risk Impact

PRA Cord 1

Late-onset in dachshunds, it’s a collection of inherited diseases affecting the retina that causes blindness. Generally, it presents with initial night blindness, with a slow deterioration of vision until the dog is completely blind. There is no pain associated with the disease.

This mutation is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. Due to DNA testing, this disease is now under control.

Result: Carrier by DNA

Moderate Risk Impact

Osteogenesis Imperfecta

Affected dogs typically present between 3 to 4 weeks of age with pain, lameness, and fractures. Bones of affected dogs are thinner than normal, fracture easily, and do not heal properly. Other features of the disorder include loose joints and brittle teeth. Because of the severity of the disease, pups with OI are usually euthanized by 3 months of age.

This mutation is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. Due to DNA testing, this disease is now under control, with no known reports in Australia.

Result: Clear by DNA

Low-Moderate Impact Risk

Sanfilippo Syndrome Type A / Mucopolysaccharidosis IIIA

Affected dogs typically present around 3 years of age with neurologic deterioration. It does not generally affect life expectancy.

This mutation is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. Due to DNA testing, this disease is now under control with no reports in Australia.

Result: Clear by DNA

Moderate Impact Risk

Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis (NCL)

Can cause significant impairment to balance and coordination and signs of discomfort in affected dachshunds.  It may involve relatively high treatment/management costs, and can sometimes reduce life expectancy.

This mutation is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. Due to DNA testing, this disease is now under control with no reports in Australia.

Result: Clear by DNA

Spinal Backscoring

5 high-quality Spinal X-rays are taken during the age of 2-4 years. The X-rays are sent for review by a spinal analyst, Dr. Alana Rosenblatt, University of Queensland.

The aim of X-ray screening for IVDD is to reduce the occurrence of herniations in future generations by breeding dogs that have low numbers of calcifications in higher-risk locations, like in the middle of the back. 

This is a voluntary test done at the breeder's discretion.

Result: Grade 2

Patellar Apprehension Test

 This condition only affects the rear legs, often seen in small breeds of dogs such as yorkies, toy poodles, corgis and dachshunds. The patella, or kneecap, is part of the stifle joint (knee). In patellar luxation, the kneecap luxates, or pops out of place, either in a medial or lateral position.

Bilateral involvement is most common, but unilateral is not uncommon.

By screening the parents it is less likely that their offspring are affected. This is a voluntary test done at the breeder's discretion.

Result: Grade 0 | 0 (Normal)

Basic Cardiac Examination

Auscultation (listening with a stethoscope)

The examiner gradually moves the stethoscope across all valve areas and also should auscultate over the subaortic area, ascending aorta, pulmonary artery, and the left craniodorsal cardiac base. Following examination of the left precordium, the right precordium is examined.

By screening the parents it is less likely that their offspring are affected. This is a voluntary test done at the breeder's discretion.

Result: Normal

Eyes

Eye examination of KC/BVA/ISDS preformed veterinary ophthalmologists

By screening the parents it is less likely that their offspring are affected. This is a voluntary test done at the breeder's discretion.

Result: Normal

Thyroid

With Hypothyroidism, the thyroid gland is not making enough of a hormone called thyroxine that controls metabolism (the process of turning food into fuel).

Hypothyroidism causes a wide variety of symptoms, but is often suspected in dogs that have trouble with weight gain or obesity and suffer from hair loss and skin problems. The good news is this disease isn’t life-threatening, it’s easy to diagnose with a blood test, and it’s fairly easy and inexpensive to treat. Treatment is typically a thyroid supplement taken daily.

CertificationFree T4 (FT4)Canine Thyroid Simulating Hormone (cTSH)Thyroglobulin Autoantibodies (TgAA)
NormalFT4 within normal rangecTSH within normal rangeTgAA negative
Positive Autoimmune ThyroiditisFT4 less than normal rangecTSH greater than normal rangeTgAA positive
Positive Compensative Autoimmune ThyroiditisFT4 within normal rangecTSH greater than or equal to normal rangeTgAA positive
Idiopathically Reduced Thyroid FunctionFT4 less than normal rangecTSH greater than normal rangeTgAA negative

By screening the parents it is less likely that their offspring are affected. This is a voluntary test done at the breeder's discretion.

Result: Normal

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